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grumpy cat on facebook

Truth be told, your actions make us feel like you don’t respect us….All we do is give, and all you do is take. We give you text posts, delicious food photos, coupons, restaurant recommendations… and what do you do in return? You take them and you hide them from all our friends.

…But the bigger picture issue is that we can’t trust you. You lied to us and said you were a social network but you’re totally not a social network. At least not anymore.

(Excerpt from a company’s “breakup letter” to Facebook, via WebProNews)

Facebook used to be pretty cool.  But not anymore.  I guess that’s the price of going public and working for your shareholders instead of your customers.

The argument against Facebook for business is pretty well laid out in the article above, but I’ll explain a bit anyway.  Facebook at one time allowed you to create a page, invite people to like (or follow) the content you added, and all was well with the world.  You’d add a video, picture, or news about yourself, product, or service – and all of your “followers” would see your stuff.  Now however, Facebook has slowly filtered who gets to see your content so that only a fraction of your fans see it.  Of course, they then offer to “boost” or “promote” your content – for a fee.

This is a twisted variation of the “freemium” model, in which you get something for free – and you can get something even better for a premium.  It’s up to you to decide if the added service is worth the investment.

In this case, Facebook is merely taking away what used to be free – and then charging you to restore it.  In many cases – as evidenced above, business is not biting.  They’re moving on.

For those that would like a better alternative, consider Google+

Most importantly – and I’ve said this 1,000 times – own your message.  That means build your online presence on your own website, and use social media to support it – instead of the other way around.

Questions?  Comments?  Leave’m below!

 

The post Getting Over Facebook appeared first on Ken Ivey.

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With a big year ahead of us, I figured it was time to do a ‘soft launch’ to officially announce “Living Water Digital”.

So what does this mean?

At least for now, we’ll be selectively be taking on clients as we roll out our services and get staffed.

You know those cool author pictures you sometimes see in Google’s search results?  They may be slowly going away, in a move Google’s Matt Cutts says will increase the quality of search results.  Authorship – Googles way to attribute something you write online to your profile, has been found to increase the likelihood of getting clicks in search results pages, and that’s why you’ll often see multiple pictures on the first page for a popular search term – everybody wants the click.

authorship rich snippet

At this time, the SEO geeks haven’t determined exactly why people are getting cut, but it’s suspected that quality and authority of the website plays an important role.   We’ll keep our eye on this.  In the meantime, learn more at:

http://www.virante.org/blog/2013/12/19/authorshippocalypse-google-authorship-penguin-finally-appeared/

I’m sure that as a business owner you sometimes wonder if your marketing is working.   There are lots of articles you can read on the subject – just Google the following term:

Measuring Attorney Marketing ROI

So, if you browse a bit you’ll find plenty of articles that show you how to tell if your marketing folks are doing a good job.  A good measure of success is how often you get leads – you know, how often your phone rings or you receive a web inquiry.

Here’s another fun way that I know my client’s marketing is working – after I rank a client in the search engines for a very competitive term, I start getting phone calls like this from my competitors wanting to “borrow” my client’s popularity…

Attorney Marketing


“Hi, this is John Anderson with BEEP, and we’re the attorney-focused web marketing group.  And, the reason I’m calling is I’m seeking relevant links for my attorney clients so I was hoping if you could possibly do relevant links exchange, uh, since we’re only focused on the attorneys and law firms of our marketing so and I hope you understand the link building which helps us to drive traffic and all that. So if you are open to this arrangement you can reach me at BEEP and you have a great day, bye.”

I’m pretty sure if they really knew that I do this professionally  (attorney marketing ) they wouldn’t have left the message – but it’s comforting to be unknowingly promoted by the competition, LOL!

Listen, marketing is something EVERY business owner needs to do to stay successful.  If you have the time, then learn all you can about making your business easy to find for your clients, and take action – even if it isn’t perfect. If you need help promoting YOUR organization, you can reach me here.

Have a great day – Ken

The post Measuring ROI for Attorney Marketing appeared first on Ken Ivey.

Local marketing can be a challenge, especially if you’re entrenched in traditional thinking on the subject.  All too often, I’m approached by frustrated business owners that just aren’t getting results because they’re doing “what they’ve been told” – spending hundreds on “Yellow” or other flavors of directories, television, radio, newspaper ads, etc., etc.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that – and if it works for you, then by all means keep doing it. But quite often my clients haven’t realized that their customers have changed the way they do business – which means that WE have to change the way we attract THEM.

Walmart Does Local at Scale, a Look at Their New Marketing Strategy

With it’s new targeted marketing strategy and e-commerce initiatives, Walmart is primed to redefine retail in 2014.

Local Marketing Lessons From My Barber Shop

I looked around as I sat in the chair at the local barber shop. Suddenly, I had many useful thoughts about local marketing…

This lady’s a little excitable but if you can overlook the goofy attempt to be cool – there’s actually some great advice here.

Comments? Leave them in the box below.  Questions?  Just ask – visit the contact page.  :)

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Affected by the recent “Hummingbird” update?  I’ve collected some great material on Google’s latest algorithm change.  Clients of mine will be largely unaffected, but I’m keeping my eye on the big “G” as they shift focus from link popularity to social signals, conversational search and great on-page SEO.

Originally from : http://searchengineland.com/google-hummingbird-172816

Why is it called Hummingbird?

Google told us the name come from being “precise and fast.”

When did Hummingbird start? Today?

Google started using Hummingbird about a month ago, it said. Google only announced the change today.

What does it mean that Hummingbird is now being used?

Think of a car built in the 1950s. It might have a great engine, but it might also be an engine that lacks things like fuel injection or be unable to use unleaded fuel. When Google switched to Hummingbird, it’s as if it dropped the old engine out of a car and put in a new one. It also did this so quickly that no one really noticed the switch.

When’s the last time Google replaced its algorithm this way?

Google struggled to recall when any type of major change like this last happened. In 2010, the “Caffeine Update” was a huge change. But that was also a change mostly meant to help Google better gather information (indexing) rather than sorting through the information. Google search chief Amit Singhal told me that perhaps 2001, when he first joined the company, was the last time the algorithm was so dramatically rewritten.

What about all these Penguin, Panda and other “updates” — haven’t those been changes to the algorithm?

PandaPenguin and other updates were changes to parts of the old algorithm, but not an entire replacement of the whole. Think of it again like an engine. Those things were as if the engine received a new oil filter or had an improved pump put in. Hummingbird is a brand new engine, though it continues to use some of the same parts of the old, like Penguin and Panda

The new engine is using old parts?

Yes. And no. Some of the parts are perfectly good, so there was no reason to toss them out. Other parts are constantly being replaced. In general, Hummingbird — Google says — is a new engine built on both existing and new parts, organized in a way to especially serve the search demands of today, rather than one created for the needs of ten years ago, with the technologies back then.

What type of “new” search activity does Hummingbird help?

Conversational search” is one of the biggest examples Google gave. People, when speaking searches, may find it more useful to have a conversation.

“What’s the closest place to buy the iPhone 5s to my home?” A traditional search engine might focus on finding matches for words — finding a page that says “buy” and “iPhone 5s,” for example.

Hummingbird should better focus on the meaning behind the words. It may better understand the actual location of your home, if you’ve shared that with Google. It might understand that “place” means you want a brick-and-mortar store. It might get that “iPhone 5s” is a particular type of electronic device carried by certain stores. Knowing all these meanings may help Google go beyond just finding pages with matching words.

In particular, Google said that Hummingbird is paying more attention to each word in a query, ensuring that the whole query — the whole sentence or conversation or meaning — is taken into account, rather than particular words. The goal is that pages matching the meaning do better, rather than pages matching just a few words.

Originally from : http://blog.businesswire.com/2013/10/22/what-you-need-to-know-about-google-hummingbird-when-writing-a-press-release/

Hummingbird now has a knowledge graph        

Knowledge Graph

Knowledge Graph

The knowledge graph is yet another example of how Google is transitioning from a keyword search engine to an answer engine. Google takes information about your brand from Wikipedia and your Google + account to give users a quick snapshot of your company or person. Here are Wikipedia editing guide lines. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Editing For individuals, keeping your Google + account up to date is imperative.

It’s been a long-time practice to boost your website traffic and ranking by building links from relevant websites to your site.  With all of the Google updates over the past few years, you might be wondering if you should bother with link building at all.  Here’s what Website Magazine says:

CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENT

The creation of quality, relevant content is the cornerstone of any link building program. Content can be created both on your website or as a separate piece that lives off your website. The more people like the content, the more they will read it and share it – musts to drive links and traffic. Content does not have to be text, although in some cases text is preferred. Content can be photographs, video, infographics, ebooks – the list goes on.

CREATE AUTHORITY

With the information that passes on the Internet, it is hard to decipher what is the best information. Companies need to lead in the ‘expert’ arena. By providing a consistent voice on topics appropriate to your company – via content, social media, PR – it will help distinguish the content you produce and help the chances of your content being shared.

– See more at: http://www.websitemagazine.com/content/blogs/posts/archive/2013/08/27/10-ways-to-rethink-link-building.aspx

So, are YOU creating content?  Would you even know where to start?  I know many business owners that don’t think they have the skill, creativity, time, etc., to do it – but it really doesn’t have to take a lot of that to do a passable job.  Want to know how?  Let’s talk.  :)

 

The post How are YOU building traffic? appeared first on Ken Ivey.

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If you have any questions just let me know.  Please comment below!

The post Google Rolling Out New Interface For Places appeared first on Ken Ivey.

on like bing-bong jack!

So, I got another message from Bing today – you know, the same people who are running the skewed ads poking fun at Google (for doing the same thing Bing’s been doing forever.)

It’s a really cheery “Update” – sounds good so far…  then they drop the Bing Bomb… They’re taking away our ability to post deals or coupons for free.  Presumably, that means either:

  1. You’ll soon have to pay to give away a coupon or
  2. You’ll never be able to post another deal ever.

And that’s supposed to be a good thing?  I just don’t get Microsoft.  Seems like they’re shooting themselves in the foot every time they turn around.  Maybe they’ve been hitting the “Bing-Bong” too hard.

bing-bong-no-more-deals

There name sounds a lot like “Google Places” – now called Google+ Local.  Not very original.

The post Hey! It’s on like Bing-Bong, Jack. appeared first on Ken Ivey.

This entry is part 10 of 10 in the seriesIs Social Media a Time-Suck?

Ever thought you could be involved in a conversation with Ashton Kutcher, Jon Stewart, or Miley Cyrus? What about some of your industry’s rock stars? Well, you can, through social media. Tools like Twitter and Facebook make it easy to connect with the stars and the experts on a person-to-person level. Here’s how:

  1. Get on their radar. Read their blog. See what they’re writing about. Retweet their tweets, comment on their Facebook page, and link to their content. The goal is not to become a stalker, but to let them know you’re out there, and you’re more than just a fanboy or fangirl. (If you feel a little stalker-ish, remember that they’re posting their content in a public forum, for public consumption.
  2. Add value. Leave insightful blog comments that expand on the topic. Write your own blog post and link back to theirs. Create a video response. Let them know about your experiences and results using the methods or techniques they’ve taught. 
  3. Ask a question. Give them something to respond to! Ask a question that shows you understand their topic, and that you’ve followed their information streams. Don’t make it too personal, but make it unusual – something that you haven’t seen answered elsewhere, but something other followers might wonder about, too.
  4. Don’t get offended. With tens, and sometimes hundreds, of thousands of followers, chances are that your question is one of dozens they’ll receive. If yours doesn’t get answered, don’t get hurt feelings. It’s purely a matter of volume, not anything personal against you.
  5. Rinse and repeat. Keep at it – the longer you work at establishing the relationship, the more familiar your name will seem. If your question isn’t answered the first time you ask it, post it again. Try a few times, and then move on and ask another.
  6. Give before you ask. If you’re hoping to establish a relationship with someone in your industry as a potential joint venture partner, or because you want to guest post on their blog, then you have some more work to do. The top dogs in different niches receive dozens of requests for help. Stand out from the crowd of favor-seekers by doing something for THEM first.

Getting noticed by the stars in Hollywood, or in your industry, is possible. But rather than sending a fan letter via post and waiting months for a reply, cut through the red tape and go directly to the source via social media. It will save you time, and save yourself a postage stamp.

Conclusion

As an entrepreneur, time is your most precious asset. It’s the one resource you cannot beg, borrow, steal or replace. While some people are thinking of social media as a sinkhole for losing hours and days, smart business people know they can leverage their networks for a variety of business-related purposes.  Hopefully, this series has given you some ideas for saving yourself time, money, and effort.

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